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2007 Spring Symposium Webcasts
Thursday Apr 26, 2007
2007 Spring Symposium
Tal Alexander (Weizmann Institute of Science)
The massive black hole and the stars around it are a unique laboratory for studying how relaxation processes lead to close interactions of stars and compact remnants with the central massive black hole. I will describe new results on the processes of ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Suvi Gezari (California Institute of Technology)
A supermassive black hole lurking in the nucleus of a normal galaxy will be revealed when a star approaches close enough to be torn apart by tidal forces, and a flare of radiation is emitted as the stream of stellar debris plunges onto the black hole ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Marco Chiaberge (Space Telescope Science Institute)
We have studied the nuclear emission detected in HST data of carefully selected samples of low luminosity AGN(LLAGN )in the local universe. We find faint unresolved nuclei in a significant fraction of the objects. The nuclear emission is as low as 8- ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Mario Livio (Space Telescope Science Institute)
I will discuss all the astrophysical objects that produce highly-collimated jets, in an attempt to identify the jet acceleration and collimation mechanisms. In particular, I will show that an accretion disk threaded by a relatively ordered, large sca ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Julian Krolik (Johns Hopkins University)
The fundamental problem in deriving energy from accretion onto black holes is the nature of angular momentum transport. Strong arguments link this process to MHD turbulence driven by the magneto-rotational instability. Using large-scale numerical sim ...
Wednesday Apr 25, 2007
2007 Spring Symposium
David Merritt (Rochester Institute of Technology)
The structure of galactic nuclei reflects the presence of supermassive black holes in many ways. Single SMBHs act as sinks, destroying a mass in stars equal to their own mass in roughly one relaxation time and forcing nuclei to expand. Binary SMBHs d ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Stuart Shapiro (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
Black holes are found everywhere in our universe: in compact binary X-ray sources and GRBs, in quasars, AGNs and the cores of all bulge galaxies, in binary black holes and binary black hole-neutron stars, and maybe even in the LHC! Black holes are st ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Ray Villard, Gary Horowitz, Ramesh Narayan, Joan Centrella, Mario Livio (STScI, University of California (Santa Barbara), Harvard University, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, STScI)
No description found.
2007 Spring Symposium
Jeffrey McClintock (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Starting with Cygnus X-1, we now have mass estimates for a good sample of 21 stellar black holes. The next obvious step is to measure spin. Using the straightforward methodology of fitting the X-ray continuum spectrum of the accretion disk, our team ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Ramesh Narayan (Harvard University)
During the last decade, a number of groups have developed observational tests for the presence of event horizons in astrophysical black holes. Most of these studies have focused on stellar mass black hole candidates in X-ray binaries, though one test ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Felix Mirabel (European Southern Observatory)
I will review the the main conclusions from the VI international workshop on microquasars with particular emphasis on the accretion-ejection connection, and correlations among black holes of all mass scales.
2007 Spring Symposium
Giuseppina Fabbiano (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory)
Ultraluminous X-Ray Sources Dr. Giuseppina Fabbiano (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory) Ultra-luminous X-ray Sources continue to be a source of interest, as extraordinary X-ray emitters in galaxies, and potential candidates for Intermediate Ma ...
Tuesday Apr 24, 2007
2007 Spring Symposium
Roger Blandford (Stanford University)
The observed properties of black holes and their impacts upon their galactic and circum-galactic environments depend upon the nature of the accretion process. There is some hope that the dynamics has a simple character controlled by relatively few pa ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Megan Urry (Yale University)
In recent years deep X-ray and infrared surveys have provided an efficient way to find accreting supermassive black holes in the young universe, otherwise known as active galactic nuclei (AGN). Such surveys can, unlike optical surveys, find AGN obscu ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Bradley Peterson (The Ohio State University)
Emission-line reverberation mapping explores the dynamics of gas at distances of order 1000 gravitational radii from the supermassive black holes in Type 1 (broad emission-line) active galactic nuclei. We will review the basics of the technique and d ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Duccio Macchetto (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Since the advent of HST, the progress in studying and understanding black holes has been impressive. Early questions regarding the very existence of black holes have been replaced by questions regarding the role that they play in the formation and ev ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Andreas Mueller (Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching)
The cosmological evolution of SMBHs strongly depends on their surroundings, i.e. their hosting galaxies. It is particularly interesting to study the parallel evolution of galaxies and different AGN classes. AGN can be probed by deep X-ray surveys. We ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Marianne Vestergaard (University of Arizona)
Mass scaling relationships based on broad emission line widths and continuum luminosity measurements are commonly used to estimate the mass of the central black hole in distant active galaxies and quasars. I will outline and discuss this technique wh ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Anton Koekemoer (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Searches for black holes at or beyond redshifts 6-7 have recently expanded significantly with the advent of deep, wide multiband surveys with Chandra, HST, Spitzer and large ground-based telescopes (such as GOODS, COSMOS and similar projects). I will ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Kate Brand (Space Telescope Science Institute)
How did the mass of 10^9-10^10 solar mass super-massive black holes at the center of massive galaxies in the local Universe build up? Did the bulk of the growth happen in an optically luminous AGN phase? Or did a substantial fraction of SMBH growth o ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Douglas Richstone (University of Michigan)
We'll review the host-galaxy predictors of BH mass and estimates of the mass density and mass function of BHs at zero redshift. The high end of the mass function can be compared to the AGN population. The low end of the mass function is critical to p ...
Monday Apr 23, 2007
2007 Spring Symposium
Matt Mountain (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Welcome and opening remarks by Matt Mountain, Director of the Space Telescope Science Institute.
2007 Spring Symposium
Gary Horowitz (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Although the basic classical properties of black holes have been understood since the 1970's, their quantum properties raise some of the deepest questions in theoretical physics. Some of these questions have recently been answered using string theory ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Joan Centrella (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center)
The final merger of two black holes releases a tremendous amount of energy and is one of the brightest sources in the gravitational wave sky. Observing these sources with gravitational wave detectors requires that we know the radiation waveforms they ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Dimitrios Psaltis (University of Arizona)
Black-hole astrophysics has matured to the point that, in the very near future, various observatories will routinely detect strong-field gravitational effects. In this talk, I assess in a quantitative way the prospect of testing strong-field general ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Greg Landsberg (Brown University)
As was suggested a few years ago, production of mini-black holes at the LHC and other future accelerators may be the very first signature of low-scale quantum gravity. Large cross section, spectacular signatures, as well as small backgrounds would ma ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Alexander Heger (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
Massive stars are the progenitors of most, if not all, black holes in the universe. In this talk I will discuss what is the initial mass function for black holes and neutron stars as a function of the mass of the progenitor stars. This relation also ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Steve McMillan (Drexel University)
Dynamical evolution in star clusters naturally creates an environment in which interactions among massive stars, binaries, and compact remnants are common. Young clusters may temporarily contain a significant population of stellar black holes, and cl ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Marta Volonteri (University of Michigan)
I'll discuss how massive black hole "seeds" may form in proto-galaxies, within a hierarchical cosmological framework. The growth from "seeds" to supermassive black holes, via accretion, mergers and dynamical interactions, as well as their implication ...
2007 Spring Symposium
Reinhard Genzel (Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics)
In the past decade high resolution measurements in the infrared employing adaptive optics imaging on 10m telescopes have allowed determining the three dimensional orbits stars within ten light hours of the compact radio source SgrA* at the Center of ...