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2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium Webcasts
Monday Mar 9, 2009
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Mercedes Lopez-Morales (Carnegie Institution of Washington)
Transiting exoplanets not only provide the means to establish the exact mass, radius, and therefore density of planets, but are also valuable tools to study their atmospheres, as has been nicely demonstrated by several recent results with the Hubble ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Emily Schaller (University of Hawaii)
Saturn’s moon Titan provides us with a unique laboratory in which to study a hydrological cycle on a planet other than Earth with a different condensable species (methane on Titan, water on Earth). Frequent infrared spectroscopy with the NASA Infrare ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Klaus Pontoppidan (California Institute of Technology)
With an increasing number of known exo-planetary systems, the search for proto-planets, still in the process of forming, is accelerating. A key tracer of the structure, dynamics and chemistry of proto-planetary disks in the crucial 1-10 AU region - k ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Sean Andrews (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory)
With the growing number of planetary systems found around other stars, attention is increasingly focused on the origins of our Solar System and others like it. Direct observations of the primordial reservoirs of planet-building material - the disks a ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Asaf Pe'er (Space Telescope Science Institute)
I will show evidence for a thermal emission component that accompanies the overall non-thermal spectra of the prompt emission phase in Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Both the temperature and flux of the thermal emission show a well-defined temporal behavio ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Alceste Bonanos (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Despite the large impact very massive stars (>30 Mo) have in astrophysics, their fundamental parameters remain uncertain. The most accurate method for deriving masses, radii and luminosities of such distant stars is to measure them in eclipsing binar ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Niccolo Bucciantini (University of California, Berkeley)
I will report and discuss recent results in the study of Gamma-Ray_Bursts (GRBs) engines, in particular in the so called "millisecond magnetar" model. GRBs are burst of gamma-ray energy coming from cosmological distances. Recent observational results ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Alicia Soderberg (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Throughout history, observational supernova studies have focused almost exclusively on their strong optical emission powered by the radioactive decay of nickel. Yet many of the leading breakthroughs in our understanding of supernovae and their progen ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
David Kaplan (University of California, Santa Barbara)
As soft X-rays are expected from all young neutron stars, the 7 nearest thermally emitting neutron stars offer some of the clearest clues to the true demography of such objects. At the same time, their thermal emission probes their complex and poorly ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Daniel Kasen (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Although Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) probably all come from a common progenitor star -- a near Chandrasekhar mass C/O white dwarf -- they show significant variations in their luminosities and light curve shape. Understanding the origin of this divers ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Suvi Gezari (Johns Hopkins University)
We present results from using GALEX to explore the UV Universe in the time domain. A systematic variability study of the GALEX Deep Imaging Survey has revealed UV flares from the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes, and UV flashes f ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Louis Strigari (Stanford University)
I will discuss progress that has been made in comparing the distribution of Milky Way satellites to theoretical predictions, including those from numerical simulations. I will discuss implications of these results in the context of cosmological struc ...
Tuesday Mar 10, 2009
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Jong-Hak Woo (University of California, Los Angeles)
In the present-day universe, the masses of giant black holes correlate with the properties of their host galaxies. This empirical correlation of phenomena on widely different scales suggests that the formation and evolution of galaxies and central bl ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Brandon Kelly (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
The black hole mass function (BHMF) provides a complete census of the masses of supermassive black holes and their evolution. It has become possible to estimate the masses of black holes that reside in broad line active galactic nuclei (BLAGN) using ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Marusa Bradac (University of California, Santa Barbara)
The cluster of galaxies 1E0657-56 has been the subject of intense research in the last few years. This system is remarkably well-suited to addressing outstanding issues in both cosmology and fundamental physics. It is one of the hottest and most lumi ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
David Law (University of California, Los Angeles)
I discuss the results of a multi-year OSIRIS/LGSAO survey of the internal kinematics of rapidly star-forming galaxies at redshift z ~ 2 - 3 as traced by nebular line emission on angular scales ~ 0.1''. At most 5 of the 13 best-detected galaxies have ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Elena Gallo (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
State of the art cold dark matter simulation suggest that energy `feedback' from super-massive black holes could solve a number of problems faced by the hierarchical paradigm at galactic scale, such as the observed red colors of massive spheroidal ga ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Glenn van de Ven (Institute for Advanced Study)
Studies of gravitational lensing in upcoming photometric surveys, and of kinematics from (integral-field) spectroscopy at increasing redshifts, promise to provide valuable constraints on the dark matter distribution in galaxies. As an example, I show ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Juerg Diemand (University of California, Santa Cruz)
Large cosmological simulations are now able to follow the formation and evolution of cold dark matter structures reliably and with considerable detail. I will present results about the structure and formation of galactic cold dark matter halos and di ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Kevin Bundy (University of California, Berkeley)
Galaxy mergers are not only important in the mass assembly history of galaxies, they can also radically alter galaxy properties. With simulations showing that major mergers can transform disk galaxies into spheroidals, mergers have been invoked to ex ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Julio Chaname (Carnegie Institution of Washington, DTM)
It is only via the study of the kinematics of their constituent stars (and gas, when present) that the total (luminous plus dark) mass distribution of stellar systems can be inferred. Until recently, this has been mostly done by analyzing integrated ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Richard Cool (Princeton University)
I will present a description and status report of our large area spectroscopic survey, PRIMUS. PRIMUS aims to survey 200,000 galaxies over 10 square degrees of deep Spitzer, optical, GALEX, and X-ray imaging at redshifts 0.2 to 1.0 using a new low-di ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Jenny Greene (Princeton University)
The ubiquity of supermassive black holes in bulge-dominated galaxies, combined with the remarkably tight correlation between bulge properties and central black hole mass, strongly suggest that there is an evolutionary connection between supermassive ...
Wednesday Mar 11, 2009
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Ivo Labbe (Carnegie Observatories)
Deep near-infrared imaging surveys enable us to select and study distant galaxies in the rest-frame optical, transforming our understanding of early galaxy evolution. As the vast majority of K- or IRAC-selected galaxies are too faint for spectroscopy ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Nikhil Padmanabhan (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)
Measuring the evolution of dark energy and the acceleration of the Universe is probably the foremost challenge of modern cosmology. The baryon oscillation method is a relatively new entrant into our dark energy toolbox but is now an essential element ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Janice Lee (Carnegie Observatories)
Using a complete, statistical sample of star-forming galaxies within the Local Volume, we evaluate the consistency between star formation rates (SFRs) inferred from H-alpha nebular emission and the far ultraviolet non-ionizing continuum. Our analysis ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Jonathan Pritchard (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics)
Upcoming low-frequency radio arrays offer the possibility of observing the redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen during the epoch of reionization. Extracting information about from this signal will be challenging and will likely depend on our abi ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Judd Bowman (California Institute of Technology)
New observations with the Experiment to Detect the Global EoR Signature (EDGES) have yielded the strongest direct constraints on 21 cm emission from the reionization epoch to date. The smoothness of the all-sky radio spectrum between 105 and 205 MHz ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Andrei Mesinger (Princeton University)
Feedback from ionizing radiation has been evoked to explain early, late as well as extended reionization scenarios. As the physics involved is quite complicated, and extends over large regions of parameter space, we attempt to draw general conclusion ...
2009 Hubble Fellows Symposium
Naveen Reddy (National Optical Astronomy Observatory)
I will review some of the recent efforts to constrain the star formation history of the Universe based on UV measurements, and will discuss what we have learned about the dust properties of typical star forming galaxies at high redshift based on deta ...